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Author Topic: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia  (Read 366 times)

Online Ohio Joe

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Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« on: September 09, 2019, 11:47:52 PM »
I got to wondering just how old my used steel framed '51 Navy Revolver was, so I did a little research on the internet and found out that the proof mark PN followed by XX8  makes my revolver 47 years old. It was made in 1972...

I use to shoot the heck out'a this ol' cap-n-ball .36 caliber revolver when I first got it (I think back in '78 or '79 - can't remember for sure), but it has been a very dependable revolver over the years. I attribute that to the "steel frame"

I don't know how many rounds I've put through it over the 40 - 41 years I've had it, but it sure does handle nice, and although not an actual Colt Navy - I can see why it has been said that Hickock really liked his "51" Navy Colts... It just fits your (my) hand perfectly. I think back in the '70's ol' Euroarms Brescia must of made a very close copy of an original.

I think the last time I shot it was maybe 10 years ago. I just might have to do a little range work with it one of these days,,, throw a can out on the range and skip it along. I use to do that a'lot with this revolver way back when. I'll have to check and see if I need to make up some roundball paper cartridges for it. I believe I still have some, but I'm not sure - it's been such a long time since I shot it... Still lot's of life left in it!!!
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Online Bigsmoke

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Re: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2019, 01:06:58 AM »
Joe,
Kind of reminds me of my old 1851 "Sheriff".  Also a .36 caliber.  It was a shooting fool, it was.  Amazingly accurate for a pistol utilizing Col. Colt's famous disappearing rear sight.
Sorry to say, it was a brass frame pistol and it literally shook itself apart.  I returned it to the point of sale and I have been sorry every since then, probably it was in 1970 or 1971.  IIRC, it was made by Hawes.
Them ol' '51's sure were shooters.
John
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Online Ohio Joe

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Re: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2019, 09:43:20 AM »
Quote
Them ol' '51's sure were shooters

They sure were (and are), John  :hairy

I eventually got one of those 1861 steel framed .36 Navy's with the 5-1/2" barrel made by Pietta, but it just doesn't have the fit and feel the '51 has.

Another one of my favorites is the '58 .44 Remington made by Navy Arms. I really like the grip you get when handling that revolver... I did buy a Pietta '58 .44 Remington copy with two spare cylinders, but I've never cared for the grip on this one. Just to bulky for my hand, but I liked the idea of the two spare cylinders. Unfortunately they won't switch out with the Navy Arms...

This is what comes from watching movies like 'The Outlaw Josey Wales'  :laffing

I've always tried to stay away from the brass framed revolvers - though I do have a Texas New Army .44 '58 Remington copy made by Richland Arms Co... I have to admit, it's a pleasure to shoot because of its light weight brass frame - and I've only fed it lite loads of powder.

Still, my favorite is the '51 Navy and probably always will be.  :shake
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Online Bigsmoke

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Re: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2019, 12:14:58 PM »
The Remingtons always had a way small grip for me.  Always had to hold it with one finger curled under the grips.  A Navy Arms Remington was my second black powder revolver.  I shot the heck out of that one as well.  It always shot about a foot high, so I put a dollop of solder on the front sight and that brought it kinda into line.  To the best of my knowledge, that pistol is in Canada now.  Sold it to a fellow in Alberta, but he died about 20 years ago.  No idea what ever happened to it after that.
My all time favorite revolver was the 1862 Colt Police model with the 4 1/2" barrel.  What a fantastic little revolver that is.  Of course, the grips are way small for me, but I can make it work with one finger wrapped around the grips and two fingers under.  I currently have one with the 5 1/2" barrel, but the balance isn't quite right with that setup.  Strangely enough, I have had that 8 or 9 years but have not shot it yet.  Someday, I will just sell it, but not quite yet.  I don't think it has ever been shot, to tell you the truth.  If/when I do sell it, someone will get a real nice pistol.
Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Leave the rest Up to God.

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Online Winter Hawk

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Re: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2019, 12:21:16 PM »
Steel 1851 Navy Colt replica - that is what got me into muzzle loading & black powder.  Don't know whether to be happy or cry over that!   :laffing :laffing :laffing

~Kees~
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Online Ohio Joe

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Re: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2019, 10:36:03 PM »
Well you know Kees, one thing leads to another and before you know it,,, well let's just say :Doh! I'm at a loss for words...  :o  :laffing
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Online Winter Hawk

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Re: Steel Frame 1851 Navy by Euroarms Brescia
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2019, 09:15:42 PM »
Full story is that I had completed a 2 year degree in electronics at the U of Alaska, and signed on with the White Alice Communications System, under contract with RCA.  White Alice was a series of repeater stations across Alaska to provide a link between the DEW line (Distant Early Warning) on the Arctic coast and Cheyenne Mountain NORAD base in Colorado.  Remember, this was in 1968 during the cold war era and we didn't have all these satellites like we do now to provide communications.

After going through a week of indoctrination all of the new hires were sent to the Bear Creek station near the village of Tanana, for training on the telephone equipment.  One of the regular techs on the site found out I was a gun nut and he offered me the 1851 Navy (a Dixie Gun Works import) with a bag of balls, a couple of tins of caps, a pound of DuPont FFg and one of Dixie's "hair straightener" bullet molds, all for $30.  First chance I had I went out away from the station, loaded up and fired off one cylinder, and I was hooked!

The guy (and I don't remember his name) told me that he had been at Bear Creek for a number of years.  The village of Tanana had a turkey shoot every year around Thanksgiving.  He used a flintlock longrifle and won it several years in a row.  The rules were then changed that muzzle loaders were not allowed.

And there you have the l-o-n-g version of how I got started with black powder.  Oh, it was still possible to order it through the mail, and it was shipped that way also.  Ah, the good old days!

~Kees~
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"All you need for happiness is a good gun, a good horse and a good wife." - D. Boone
USN June 1962-Nov. 65, USS Philip, DD-498